Study Won't Look Into Misconduct Complaints: IPCC

Published date: .

"); jQuery("#212 h3").html("

Related News Programmes

"); });

2019-08-23 HKT 18:48

Share this story

facebook

  • The IPCC says a Commission of Inquiry is not suitable to probe broad, complex issues like the ongoing extradition bill protests. Photo: RTHK

    The IPCC says a Commission of Inquiry is not suitable to probe broad, complex issues like the ongoing extradition bill protests. Photo: RTHK

The Independent Police Complaints Council said on Friday that its fact-finding study on the anti-extradition protest movement will only look into systemic problems regarding the management of the police force, and not into the misconduct of particular officers.

The watchdog said those complaints will be handled via the regular complaint mechanism.

The IPCC chairman Anthony Neoh admitted the IPCC's hands might be tied when handling some complaints, but he says now is not the best time to set up an independent inquiry.

Commissions of Inquiry are good for very discreet subjects. This is such a wide subject that is very, very difficult," he said. "This involves examinations, cross examinations of witnesses and so on. Not by one counsel, but possibly by quite a number of counsels."

"Again if we have that, you are not sure we will get close to the truth," said Neoh.

The chairman said the best thing to do is find a way for reconciliation and let the IPCC proceed with the work. "We should be then zero in on the specific subjects for Commission of Inquiry if that, at point of time, is the best thing to do," he said.

A team of five overseas experts from Canada, UK, Australia and New Zealand will help with the study, and the panel list will be announced in 10 days.