Congress May Review HK Ties If Bill Passed: Pelosi

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2019-06-12 HKT 13:46

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  • House speaker Nancy Pelosi says the fugitive law changes will undermine the safety of 85,000 Americans living in Hong Kong. File photo: AP

    House speaker Nancy Pelosi says the fugitive law changes will undermine the safety of 85,000 Americans living in Hong Kong. File photo: AP

The speaker of the United States House of Representatives, Democrat Nancy Pelosi, has warned that the US Congress would review Hong Kong ties if the controversial extradition bill becomes law.

Pelosi said the bill imperils the special ties under the 1992 US-Hong Kong Policy Act, enabling Washington to treat Hong Kong as a non-sovereign entity distinct from the mainland China on matters of trade and economics

She warned that if it is passed, the US Congress would reassess whether Hong Kong is "sufficiently autonomous" under the One Country, Two Systems principle.

In a statement offering support to protesters against the bill, Pelosi said the extradition bill "chillingly showcases Beijing’s brazen willingness to trample over the law to silence dissent and stifle the freedoms of the people of Hong Kong."

She also said the proposed legislation "would legitimise and legalise the kidnapping of businessmen, booksellers and anyone that China disagrees with" and undermine the safety of 85,000 Americans living in Hong Kong.

On the record breaking protest rally last weekend, Pelosi said "the hearts of all freedom-loving people were moved by the courage of the one million men and women of Hong Kong who took to the streets on Sunday to peacefully demand their rights, defend their sovereignty and denounce this horrific extradition bill."

The US House speaker was among a group of American politicians that met last month in Washington with a visiting Hong Kong delegation opposing the bill, including former chief secretary Anson Chan and opposition lawmakers Charles Mok and Alvin Yeung.